learning

I love to learn. I want to know everything.

Studying French with Project Gutenberg

My current approach to studying French is to make my way through some popular literature, picking up vocabulary words along the way.

I've found a number of Jules Verne works at Project Gutenberg, many available in both French and English. (I've seen several posts on one of the learning language forums reporting good results from reading a book in English and then in the original language. So far, I'm starting with the French, but I may change my mind.)

I decided to start with Around the World in 80 Days.

Learning the Greek Alphabet

The problem with wanting to learn everything is that everything I learn makes me want to learn more of everything else.

I picked up some paperback Homer, both Odyssey and Iliad, at the big library book sale this year. Then, somewhere, I stumbled across a book called Homeric Moments: Clues to Delight in Reading the Odyssey and the Iliad. (I think I was just poking around in the library's online catalog.)

Basic Concepts in Music, Chapter 5

I finished chapter 5 (of 7) in this self-paced programmed music theory book. A lot of it is review of things I learned in piano lessons; I've been really happy to discover that I remember the major scales as well as I do. I did learn the functional names of the various chords: tonic, supertonic, mediant, subdominant, dominant, submediant, leading, and then back to tonic.

I have another programmed music course when I'm finished with this one. I'd like to supplement these things with Practica Musica exercises.

Change Ringing? Large Number Duel? Sign Me Up!

I have this sudden urge to go to MIT.

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